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Cancer Nutrition Respiratory

Food additives linked to lung cancer

10 years, 7 months ago

1707  0
Posted on Dec 29, 2008, 7 a.m. By Rich Hurd

New research suggests that inorganic phosphates, commonly used food additives found in a variety of processed foods including meat, cheese, drinks, and bread products, may increase the risk and accelerate the spread of lung cancer.

New research suggests that inorganic phosphates, commonly used food additives found in a variety of processed foods including meat, cheese, drinks, and bread products, may increase the risk and accelerate the spread of lung cancer.

Myung-Haing Cho and his colleagues at Seoul National University fed mice with lung cancer a diet containing similar levels of inorganic phosphates to those in the human diet.  At the end of the four-week analysis of the lung tissue revealed that consuming a diet containing high levels of inorganic phosphates stimulated the growth of tumors.

Previous studies have suggested that the majority of cases of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are linked to the activation of specific signaling pathways in lung tissue. Results of this study showed that high levels of inorganic phosphates can stimulate these pathways.

“Our study indicates that increased intake of inorganic phosphates strongly stimulates lung cancer development in mice, and suggests that dietary regulation of inorganic phosphates may be critical for lung cancer treatment as well as prevention,” concluded Dr Cho.

Jin H. Xu CX, Lim HT, et al. High Dietary Inorganic Phosphate Increases Lung Tumorigenesis and Alters Akt Signaling. American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. 2009;179:59-68. doi: 10.1164/rccm.200802-306OC.

 

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